Semen Cuscutae Chinensis  or Tu Si Zi are an herbal supplement so powerful that they are actually known as the “Dodder Seed” in traditional Chinese medicine. Ironically enough, the plant they are harvested from, Semen cuscutae, is also known as a weed. 

Yet the Dodder Seed has been widely used to treat impotence, premature, ejaculation, and frequent urination in China for centuries. The Chinese even labeled Tu Si Zi a “longevity herb” because of its ability to stop the loss of fluids from the body. Other popular uses for semen cuscutae seeds in traditional Chinese medicine included treatment of eye problems such as blurred vision and dry eyes.

An Anti-inflammatory Treatment

There has been some research in China that indicates that cuscuta seeds are an anti-inflammatory which means they reduce inflammation. Doctors now believe that inflammation is the source of a wide variety of problems including arthritis and kidney problems.

A study in the American Journal of Chinese Medicine found that cuscuta seeds actually reduce weakness and aching in the joints and knees. The seeds also “tonified” the liver and kidney and counteracted the effects of diarrhea. Since they enhance liver and kidney functions, cuscuta seeds can increase and enhance the body’s ability to rid itself of toxins.

Many Americans and Canadians are in lousy health because their environment and food is filled with toxins. These toxins are one of the main causes of impotence and sexual dysfunction as well as many of the health problems widely associated with aging. Memory loss associated with dementia may actually be caused by brain damage from toxins rather than aging.

Cuscuta and Semen

Some of the most interesting research in China involved semen and cuscutae. Rats fed a variety of cuscuta seeds called semen cuscutae showed an increase in the level of testosterone in their blood and increased weight of their testicles.

The researcher in the study at Shantou University School of Medicine in China concluded that semen cuscutae “invigorates the reproductive system” in male rats. Among other things, it was shown to increase semen production. This means it could be an excellent treatment for male infertility.

How to Take Advantage of the Doctor Seeds

The standard dosage of cuscuta seeds used to treat infertility is between nine and 15 grams a day. The seeds can be eaten or consumed in powdered or capsule form. Cuscuta seed powder can be mixed with food and beverages such as soups, shakes, and smoothies as well as juices.

Most herbalists recommend that Tu Si Zi be taken with a number of other Chinese tonic herbs. Other herbs often mixed with include tribulus and cistanche which are available online in pure form.

The best cuscuta seeds are the pure form purchased online. Those manufactured in China are generally considered superior because they are purer. Some herbalists recommend dried cuscuta seeds but there are a few that prescribe the powder.

Is Cuscutae Safe?

Semen cuscutae is a very safe treatment for men to take advantage of. The only people advised not to take it are those suffering from constipating and women that are pregnant or breast feeding.

The reason persons with constipation should not take is that cuscutae reduces urination and thirst. Reducing urination and thirst can make constipation worse by reducing the flow of water through the body. Generally, it is recommended that persons suffering from diarrhea consume lots of water to increase bowel movement.

Pregnant women, nursing women, and children should avoid cuscutae because it stimulates hormone production. Stimulation of hormones can interfere with the growth mechanism in children, babies in the womb and infants. The increase of testosterone production from cuscutae could also interfere with the female reproductive system.

Despite these potential problems, it is easy to see why cuscutae has been labeled “The Dodder Seed.” It can help men overcome infertility and some of the problems associated with aging.

 

You can find high quality Semen Cuscutae (Dodder Seed) extract powder by visiting – http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00I2I9F4Y 

 

Resources:

  • http://www.acupuncturetoday.com/herbcentral/cuscuta.php
  • http://www.raysahelian.com/semen-cuscutae.html
  • http://www.suntenglobal.com/news/show.php?ID=154&page=5
  • http://beforeitsnews.com/health/2012/08/chinese-herbs-in-western-view-tu-si-zi-semen-cuscutae-chinensis-health-benefits-and-side-effects-2446066.html

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